by JENNIFER ROBACK MORSE

This article was first posted January 26, 2015, at National Catholic Register.

The recent news-cycle flap over Pope Francis and the bunnies has confused many people inside and outside of the Catholic Church.

Lots of people continue to be concerned that the Holy Father ought to be clearer in his manner of speaking. I would like to make something good out of this latest situation.

The idea came to me from listening to homilies from two very faithful priests. I do not mind naming them. I heard Father Carl Gismondi, of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter and of St. Anne’s parish in San Diego, give a homily on the “Who am I to judge?” comment. I heard Father Jerome Fasano of St. John the Baptist parish in Front Royal, Va., preach on a similar topic.

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by Jennifer Johnson

One man plus one woman = two legally recognized parents for children.[Photo: One man plus one woman = two legally recognized parents for children.]

I believe that the divide between conservatives on the marriage issue runs deeper than marriage. Over on Ricochet, on Peter Robinson’s marriage thread, several times I asked a question that went something like this:

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Around March of 2013 I came across the words of a prominent LGBT activist named Masha Gessen:
I have three kids who have five parents, more or less, and I don’t see why they shouldn’t have five parents legally… I would like to live in a legal system that is capable of reflecting that reality, and I don’t think that’s compatible with the institution of marriage.

Imagine having five parents! Here’s what it means: it means going back and forth between all those households on a regular basis, never having a single place to call home during your most tender and vulnerable years. It means having divided Christmases, other holidays, and birthdays–you spend one with one parent, and another with the other parent, never spending a single holiday or birthday with both parents. Imagine having each of your parents completely ignore the other half of you, the other half of your family, as if it did not even exist. Meanwhile, imagine each parent pouring their energy into their new families and creating a unified home for their new children. These experiences give you the definite impression of being something leftover, something not quite part of them. You live like that on a daily basis for 18+ years.

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by  , Senior Fellow and Director of the Marriage and Religion Research Institute at the Family Research Council, and Ruth Institute Circle of Experts member.

This article was first published at The Public Discourse on March 11, 2013.

This year, the Supreme Court will render judgment on the institution of marriage. Though most of us don’t realize it, the Court first did so forty-one years ago in Eisenstadt v. Baird, a decision that gravely wounded marriage and set the nation on a course of gradual debilitation by ruling that states could not restrict the sale of contraceptives to unmarried people.

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by Patrick Fagan

February 6th, 2013 http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2013/02/7821/

Family, church, and school are the three basic people-forming institutions, and it is no wonder that they produce the best results–including economic and political ones–when they cooperate.

Even if all the market reforms of the Washington think tanks, the Wall Street Journal, and Forbes Magazine were enacted, we’d still need to kiss the Great American Economy goodbye. Below the level of economic policy lies a society that is producing fewer people capable of hard work, especially married men with children. As the retreat from marriage continues apace, there are fewer and fewer of these men, resulting in a slowly, permanently decelerating economy.

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