The Implications of United States Ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child

Introduction

The purpose of this submission is to provide evaluative analysis of the potential implications of ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC or Convention) and to inform the public of perspectives regarding ratification. The CRC is a United Nations treaty seeking to promote children’s rights such as access to welfare, claim to a good education, and entitlement to freedom of religion.  Despite these laudable goals, there is substantial controversy regarding adoption of the treaty in the United States.  The current political climate brings this issue to the forefront as the Obama administration is researching when and how it will be possible to ratify the CRC with the concern that the United States may be falling behind as a leader in human rights without its ratification.  However, it appears that ratification of the CRC would impede United States sovereignty and fail to accomplish its intended purpose to increase human rights on a worldwide scale.

The current thesis presents an evaluative analysis of these potential implications of U.S. ratification of the CRC through providing the following: (1) a comparison of the United States’ existing law with legislation that would be required under the Convention, (2) an examination of the underlying assumptions and possible interpretations of the Convention through studying the changes its ratification has brought about in other countries, (3) an exploration of the potential risk to national sovereignty that would result from ratification of a treaty overseen by a body outside of the United States government. A thorough review of the potential implications provided through this evaluative analysis will contribute to a more informed position regarding ratification of the CRC than has been available to this point.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

Published at ToTheSource.org November 26, 2008 and October 14, 2004.

Apparently, Western secularism pulled from its traditional roots cannot.

We cannot sustain ourselves economically because the Western democracies are committing financial suicide with federal spending and entitlement programs that they then push off onto future generations instead of paying today.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

“It Takes a Village to Raise a Child,” was Hillary Clinton’s Big Idea in the 1990s. Hillary’s supporters and detractors alike regard that slogan as a thinly-veiled code for increasing the government’s responsibility for the care of children. The demographic decline of Europe illustrates what would happen if we took this Village-Raising-Children image seriously.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

International programs are focused on the wrong issues when it comes to fighting AIDS. The basic problem lies in promiscuity and concurrent partners.

Amid reports that the United Nations has been grossly overestimating the scope of the global AIDS pandemic, a new book points to what may be an even greater miscalculation: AIDS relief efforts have failed to understand the crucial role of family and community networks in controlling the disease.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D  First published at Townhall.com December 11, 2006.

The Democrats are already forming their strategy for reintroducing “Comprehensive Immigration Reform” when they take power next January. Reports from a meeting of Democrats Ted Kennedy and Luis Gutierrez, with Arizona Republicans John McCain and Jeff Flake indicate that the plan is to wait until the Democrats have “dealt with” Iraq (whatever that means) and raised the minimum wage. They’ll be ready to go with a new version of the Senate bill that failed last summer.

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