by Jennifer Roback Morse

This article was first published at Thomas International Center.

Have you ever heard comments like these? “People oppose gay marriage only for religious reasons, because there really aren’t any rational non-religious reasons to oppose gay marriage.” “You are fighting for a lost cause. Marriage was lost a long time ago.” And finally, how about this one, “It is time to throw in the towel, and accept the inevitable.”

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By Stephen Baskerville, a Ruth Institute Circle of Experts Member

This article was first published April 8, 2013, at World Net Daily.com.

The fight to save marriage, as current being waged, is largely pointless. It simply cannot be won on these terms. If defenders of marriage can let go of their own politically correct fixations and squarely face some harsh but incontrovertible facts, it is still possible to stop the impending destruction of marriage by the courts.

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by  , Senior Fellow and Director of the Marriage and Religion Research Institute at the Family Research Council, and Ruth Institute Circle of Experts member.

This article was first published at The Public Discourse on March 11, 2013.

This year, the Supreme Court will render judgment on the institution of marriage. Though most of us don’t realize it, the Court first did so forty-one years ago in Eisenstadt v. Baird, a decision that gravely wounded marriage and set the nation on a course of gradual debilitation by ruling that states could not restrict the sale of contraceptives to unmarried people.

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by Patrick Fagan

February 6th, 2013 http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2013/02/7821/

Family, church, and school are the three basic people-forming institutions, and it is no wonder that they produce the best results–including economic and political ones–when they cooperate.

Even if all the market reforms of the Washington think tanks, the Wall Street Journal, and Forbes Magazine were enacted, we’d still need to kiss the Great American Economy goodbye. Below the level of economic policy lies a society that is producing fewer people capable of hard work, especially married men with children. As the retreat from marriage continues apace, there are fewer and fewer of these men, resulting in a slowly, permanently decelerating economy.

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by Elizabeth Crnkovich

This article was first published December 10, 2012, at the Population Research Institute.

A recent Family in America conference in D.C. lays out the problem, and speaker Jennifer Roback Morse provides a solution.

Past generations of American pioneers, known for their openness to life, would not have believed it. They would be astonished to learn that, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, a woman’s fertility is not celebrated but discouraged. Women who marry early, leave the workforce, and devote themselves to the birthing and raising of children are not the norm. On the contrary, a woman is expected to pass her most fertile years acting like a man, building up a strong career, and making a lot of money. Only after she is thus “established” and has “enough money” is she allowed to start thinking about having children.

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