by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

Legalizing same-sex “marriage” is not a stand-alone policy, independent of all the other activities of the state. Once governments assert that same-sex unions are the equivalent of marriage, those governments must defend and enforce a whole host of other social changes.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

My Grandfather’s Son, the autobiography of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, will be a classic American memoir. It is a rare combination of timeless saga and period piece. Thomas’s autobiography is the archetypal American rags to riches story that is so much a part of our national character. At the same time, Thomas’s memoirs will offer future generations a window into the late twentieth-century. His story will be of particular interest to American Catholics, because it is not only the life of a black American: it is also the life of an American Catholic.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

This article was originally published in the National Catholic Register January 16, 2005.

What do the newly released DVD Shark Tales, Dr. Laura and Christianity have in common? They all teach that real love can make a Somebody out of anybody. The movie does its teaching indirectly, while talk-show host Dr. Laura Schlessinger and Christianity just come right out and say it. But these dissimilar cultural icons of Dr. Laura and Oscar the fishy star of Shark Tales are supporting a message basic to Christianity.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

This article was first published in the National Catholic Register on July 4, 2004.

On Monday, May 17, 2004, the state of Massachusetts began issuing marriage licenses to same sex couples. The very first day indicted two of the most prominent arguments in favor of gay marriage. The “conservative” case that gay marriage would strengthen the overall condition of marriage was completely discredited. And events proved that the federalism argument was almost certainly offered in bad faith by at least some advocates of gay marriage.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

Published at National Catholic Register February 7, 2004.

Maybe my headline exaggerates a bit, but not much. In all the furor over Bush’s immigration plan, one essential point has been overlooked. Some of our illegal immigration problem arises from government regulations mandating higher wages and benefits than the market can sustain. Many commentators recognize the gap between Mexican and American jobs as an immigration magnet. But few people make the connection that artificially high compensation levels, in and of themselves, create a market for illegal jobs.

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