by Anne Morse, Media Coordinator for the Population Research Institute.

This article was first published at pop.org on June 11, 2014.

Long, long ago, when Anne’s parents were in college (sorry, mom and dad), demographers made an observation: they saw that for most of human history, even though couples were having far more than two children, mortality was also very high. The result was that populations either stayed the same or grew very slowly.

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By Anne Morse

This article was first published February 6, 2014 at pop.org.

Reports of terrorist threats, human rights abuses, and general economic incompetency have already marred the opening of the 2014 winter Olympics. These failings in Russia represent the face of the greatest myth propagated this past half-century: that low-fertility creates a successful society. 

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By Anne Morse, Ruth Institute “It Takes a Family” 2010 conference alumna
This article was first published October 18, 2013, at the Population Research Institute (pop.org).

For most of the world, today is Friday, a happy day that leads into the weekend. For Paul Ehrlich and Dr. Doug Stein, however, today is World Vasectomy Day!

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by Jennifer Roback Morse

At last, a book on demography that talks about its relation to sexual culture.

This article was originally published March 19, 2013, at Mercatornet.com.

I was talking with a Catholic college student who is enrolled in a graduate level demography class on fertility at a major state university.  She said that when her classmates make snarky remarks about “those Catholics” and their large families, the whole class nods knowingly in agreement.

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Population Decline and the Birth Dearth

On March 7, 2013, in Population, by Betsy

by Scott Yenor

This article was first published at The Public Discourse on February 26, 2013.

Jonathan Last’s new book attributes population decline and the birth dearth to two trends that started in the Enlightenment era—first, an effort to limit death; second, an effort to control birth. Both trends are guided by a desire to control nature.

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