Colleges and Labor Markets Should Adjust to Women’s Needs

By Napp Nazworth

This article was first published at The Christian Post on December 11, 2012.

There is not a “war on women,” but there is a “war on women’s fertility,” Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse, an economist and president of the Ruth Institute, believes. Rather than view fertility as a problem to be solved, Morse argued Friday, fertility should be viewed as a gift from God. Colleges and labor markets should, therefore, adjust to the biological needs of women.

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by Samantha Schroeder, Ruth Institute “It Takes a Family” Summer Conference 2012 alumna.

Last Friday, Rush Limbaugh made a comment toward the end of his talk show blaming feminism for “ruining women.”

Limbaugh commented on feminist academic Camille Paglia’s article in The Hollywood Reporter. He read excerpts from her article critiquing American pop culture, citing it as the source of poor role models for young men and women, and the inaccurate portrayal of a “manliness” epitomized by the Twilight series:

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by Jennifer Roback Morse

This article was first published at familyinamerica.org on January 10, 2012.

Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men by Mara Hvistendahl
Public Affairs, 2011; 314 pages, $26.99

This brave and timely book has many strengths and one glaring, but understandable, weakness. The strength of this book is the reporting. Mara Hvistendahl, a liberal, pro-choice feminist, painstakingly documents the catastrophic consequences of the worldwide “choice” for male babies: gender imbalance leading to prostitution, sex slavery, and male frustration and aggression. The weakness of this book is the political analysis. She doesn’t understand how deeply Roe v. Wade changed American political culture, particularly within the conservative movement broadly conceived. But both these strengths and weaknesses work together to yield an honest and courageous book that should be read by anyone who considers himself (or herself) well informed.

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