Colleges and Labor Markets Should Adjust to Women’s Needs

By Napp Nazworth

This article was first published at The Christian Post on December 11, 2012.

There is not a “war on women,” but there is a “war on women’s fertility,” Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse, an economist and president of the Ruth Institute, believes. Rather than view fertility as a problem to be solved, Morse argued Friday, fertility should be viewed as a gift from God. Colleges and labor markets should, therefore, adjust to the biological needs of women.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

The Family Medical Leave Act of 1993 was inspired by the desire to help mothers manage working and family emergencies. Like many well-intentioned laws, the FMLA has been plagued by unintended consequences and expensive abuses, especially costly for small businesses. Like many bureaucratic programs, it has been abused by people who are savvy enough to scam the rules. Free negotiation by workers and firms potentially could provide a superior solution to the problems the FMLA was supposed to solve.

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Are Children Worth it?

On January 28, 2009, in Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D, by Betsy

by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

Published at ToTheSource.org January 28, 2009.

Let us state it at once: Revolutionary Road is a bad movie, despite the awards it garnered from its Hollywood peers. The story is Hollywood’s fantasy of the stultifying life in the 1950’s suburbs. Unbelievable storyline, unsympathetic characters, and a socially irresponsible message: evidently these are the requirements for Hollywood awards.

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The Legacy and Future of Feminism Conference

Harvard University, April 11, 2008

Opening statement by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D.

The subject of this panel is “Bringing Home and Frying up the Bacon: Home versus Work.” I am here to say that women have been poorly served by the way work and home balance has been framed. The trend of increasing educational attainment and labor force participation of married women began at the turn of the twentieth century, well before the modern feminist movement. The 1960-style feminism assigned a particular meaning to these trends and drove them into a very specific channel. In my view, this direction has been almost entirely destructive.

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by Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D

Published at ToTheSource.org May 8, 2007.

The stay at home mothers of America have been taking a pounding from the literary elites. Two recent books decry the trend of educated women staying home full-time with children. Linda Hirshman exhorts women to Get to Work, while Leslie Bennetts believes she sees The Feminine Mistake and wonders “Are we giving up too much”? Both Baby Boomer professional women worry that the younger generation is making a mistake. At the very least, these authors argue, women should keep their professional skills fresh, simply as strategic protection against the risk of divorce. But if marriage is a lifelong collaboration between women and men, a good and stable marriage can help women meet both their professional and personal goals. Mothers’ Day is a good time to reflect on spousal cooperation.

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